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UN Declaration of Human Rights translated into Pintupi-Luritja

A story By Hannah Walmsley with Alex Sloan for the ABC.

Over the past few years Pintupi-Luritja people have been working to translate the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights into their languages.

Pintupi-Luritja is said to be the first language of about 2000 people in Central Australia, and the second language of many more people.

The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights is the world's most translated document, having been translated into more than 460 languages since it was first adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1948.


This is the first time it has been translated in to an Indigenous Australian language.

You can download the translation here: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Pages/Language.aspx?LangID=piu
Or download the English version here: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Pages/Language.aspx?LangID=eng

Read the full article at here

Mother Tongue with ABC Open

e card Mother TongueWe would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all the communities and ABC Open producers who participated in the Mother Tongue project through 2014 and 2015.

More than 80 films were made through the project with communities sharing over 60 languages.

If you haven’t yet made a film with your ABC Open producer make sure you get in contact to see how you can work together to promote your languages.

For those of you who have been involved we look forward to seeing lots more collaborations and films about your language and the work you do.

You can watch all the beautiful films on the ABC Open website.

Warra: Building teams, building resources

WarraTogether with language centres around the country First Languages Australia has produced Warra: Building teams, building resources. Warra has been designed to save time and effort for everyone involved in language resource production by summarising key things that need to be considered when planning to make language resources.

Warra takes a broad view of what resources are. It includes project examples such as the production of children’s books, traditional stories, music CDs, videos and DVDs, websites, classroom materials, radio programs and blogs.

The project has seen very high level of participation and contribution from language centres and projects around the country. Participating project 
teams have shared their knowledge through this process in order to save 
others having to learn the hard way. Without these contributions Warra would not be the useful resource it is.

There will always be unique challenges to overcome with any project, but hopefully Warra will make your work a little easier.

First Languages Australia hopes that Warra will encourage strong, productive teamwork and help you to feel confident and enjoy the process of creating resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages.


Download Warra here.

'Warra' is a noun for ‘talk’ that also means ‘language’, ‘speech’, the act of talking, ‘voice’, ‘throat’ and ‘word’, in the Kaurna language of the Adelaide Plains. The rr in warra is a rolled r-sound. The a-sound in warra is pronounced as in Maori haka. The title Warra has been contributed by Kaurna Warra Pintyanthi and is shared by related languages, including Nukunu and Narungga.

Gambay - Australian First Languages Map

First Languages Australia has been working with regional language centres nationally to develop an interactive map of Australian languages that reflects the names and groupings favoured by community.

Language workers from around the country are reviewing the data in their regions and contributing profiles that explain why their languages are so important to them.

Gambay includes teachers notes and curriculum links P-12 so is also a great resource for parents, teachers and students.

Check it out:
gambay.com.au

Gambay means “together” in the Butchulla language of the Harvey Bay region in Queensland. Gambay is pronounced Gam-bay. Gam is is pronounced as in ‘gamin', and bay as in the English. This title has been provided by Joy Bonner.

showcase5

Australia's Got Language (documentary)

AGLCoverThe Australia’s Got Language Talent Content was an entertaining parody inspired by talent programs such as X Factor, Australia’s Got Talent, Red Faces and Australian Idol – showcasing Deadly Aboriginal Australian talents performing in their Aboriginal Languages.

The Australia's Got Language Talent Contest is part of the Puliima National Indigenous Language Forum, a biennial event hosted by Miromaa Aboriginal Language and Technology Centre. PUliima brings people together from all over Australia pioneering project ideas from community based Indigenous language projects all sharing a common ambition of preserving and celebrating the languages of our country.

The charasmatic and entertaining judges for the night were Leonard Miller from Far West Language Centre, Geoff Anderson from Parkes Wiradjuri Language Group, Vicki Couzens from Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages and Karina Lester from the South Australian Mobile Language Team. Audience participation was loud and proud and extremely encouraged.

Filmed by First Languages Australia on location in a relaxed cocktail dinner setting, on the night of August the 28th 2013, Australia’s Got Language documentry is a low budget high entertainment program, celebrating and showcasing the depth and diversity of Aboriginal Language and Culture across Australia.

Watch the 14minute film.

Film Credits

Produced by
First Languages Australia and
Miromaa Aboriginal Language & Technology Centre

Host/Concept
Daryn McKenny - Gamilaraay

Director/Producer
Faith Baisden

Judges
Geoff Anderson – Wiradjuri
Leonard Miller – Wirangu
Karina Lester – Pitjantjatjara/Yankunytjatjara
Vicki Couzens – Keeraywoorroong

Participants
Andy Luckaman Peters and David Wilfred – Wagilak
Jacqueline Allen – Wonnaruah
Michelle Jacquelin-Furr and Brooke Joy - Boandik
Iteka and Temana Bromley - Adnyamathanha
Joy Bonner, Karina Barney, Alwyn Doolan and Ashleigh Clarke – Butchulla
Dianne Appleby, Rebecca Youdale and Virgina Albert - Yawuru
Fay Stewart Muir - Boonwurrung
Lynnette Solomon-Dent – Monaro/Ngarigo
Corey Theatre –Gunditjmara/Gunnai
Leonora Adidi - Kalaw Kawaw Ya
Melinda Holden and Bridget Priman - Warrgamay
Faith Baisden – Yugambeh

Production Manager
Carolyn Barker

Camera/Sound
Elizabeth Warning

Editor
Leah Donovan

Sound Editor
Tfer Newsome

Funded by
First Languages Australia
Indigenous Languages Support Program, Australian Government, Attorney-General's Department, Ministry for the Arts

Marrin Gamu: Many languages, one song

Marrin Gamu is a song and educational resource that has been created to introduce Australians to the diversity and beauty of Australia's hundreds of first languages.

The title Marrin Gamu combines the word for ‘body’ in two of the languages in the film clip: Marrin – Wiraduji (NSW), and Gamu – Kalaw Kawaw Ya (Torres Strait).

There are two ways for students to participate in Marrin Gamu, either as part of an existing Aboriginal or Torres Strait Island language program, or as a mainstream classroom activity.

Watch the video and find all the resources on the Marrin Gamu website: http://marringamu.com.au/

Help share the message, 'Australia is home to hundreds of Indigenous languages!"

Marrin Gamu

 

Contact Us

 
Phone
+61 2 4940 9144  or
1300 975 246
 
First Languages Australia
Postal address
PO Box 528 Newcastle 2300
 
Administration
Level 1/840 Hunter St
Newcastle West, NSW 2302

Learn more

  • Join First Languages Australia's network +

    You can assist in the work of First Languages Australia by becoming an active member of our network. Collectively First Read More
  • Australia’s First Languages +

    Australia’s First Languages are a wonderful and precious resource. Australia is situated in one of the world’s linguistic hot spots. Read More
  • Why maintain languages? +

    There are many reasons to maintain Australia's first languages. Chapter 3 of the Australian Human Rights Commission, Social Justice Report Read More
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